Rejuvenation

Some of you will know the magnificent Willow tree on the edge of our site. Children climb it and grown ups love the shade…sometimes it has a hammock or two hanging from it’s ample branches.
Sadly, as often happens with Willows the gales took a toll on it and some large splits appeared at the main fork. We have had to pollard it, so for a while it will look, frankly, a bit butchered. All being well the cracks will heal and regrowth will be stronger and very quick. We made the pollard cuts high up to make sure the tender new growth is out of reach of the dozens of naughty deer that visit every night.

Raptor!

I have just settled in our first caravan of the new season – keen birdwatchers. While we were standing having a chat after getting the van into position we were thrilled to see a raptor glide in the gate and along the hedgerow about 6 feet above the ground…we looked at each other and smiled….it was a Merlin. What a great start to their stay here in the New Forest.

New Web SIte

As it’s the quiet time of year it seemed a good chance to change the web site to something more mobile friendly. All seems OK, only problem is that in the move I have lost all the old emails, not a big problem but a bit annoying. Over the coming weeks I’ll make the site prettier and add more useful information.

Oh! Deer

Visitors to our CL often ask if they will see deer during their stay – the simple answer is YES. There are dozens of Deer living within easy walking distance of the CL, in fact they often visit the field that the CL is in.  To see the Deer just take a walk – keep your eyes open and look well ahead.

Fallow deer are the most numerous by far, between the CL and Fritham there are several hundred in groups of 10 -20. Roe deer are around but mostly seen singly or Does with Fawns. There are a few Red deer around and one or two Sika, you are very unlikely to see Muntjac.

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Welcome 2016

2016 greets us with a more warm wet weather, I cut the grass in the CL 2 weeks ago and it already needs cutting again!……in early January.

Last year was good all round on our CL, lots of interested visitors who enjoyed the walking, wildlife and relaxation. Many came on site and didn’t use their vehicles the whole time they were here. I think this location really has been discovered as a prime location for New Forest walking.

I am sorry to say that we have had to increase the charge per night, it is due to three main factors that are largely unseen by visitors. The cost of power, the cost of waste disposal (classed as commercial waste) and the cost of insurance, all outside of our control.  We didn’t anticipate the amount of power used by modern vans when we set the charge after installing hook ups, so, although power hasn’t increased in price that much we have to cover the costs. I hope you’ll agree it’s still good value for a site right in the ‘Forest’

The Bermuda booking triangle

It’s very odd, we have a lean looking spell for bookings right in the middle of August. If you fancy staying in the New Forest in the middle of August (2nd and 3rd week) then chances are we can fit you in.

The real New Forest

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I have just found a web site that gives you the information that you really need. It’s not a load of fluff about topless buses and twerky cars – it’s the lowdown on what the New Forest is all about: plants, animals, history and people. The site is a tad slow but well worth the wait. It’s run by the New Forest Volunteer Rangers – sadly my only encounters with them have been when I have parked inappropriately (in their eyes) and found them rather officious – but I am sure they are only carrying out orders.

The web site is great though, take a look:

The New Forest Volunteer Rangers web site

 

Killers in the mire

If you bring children to the New Forest chances are they will be fascinated if you show them the carnivorous plants that grow in the valley mires (bogs).

Drosera rotundifolia
Drosera rotundifolia

Most photos of  Sundew show them up close and you might be encouraged to expect them to be chunky things as big as a cabbage and dangerous to small dogs and children…they aren’t, they are quite small just a few inches across the whole plant. Once you get your eye in you’ll see Sundew (Drosera rotundifolia) in most of the wet boggy places.

Look closely and you easily see the sticky droplets on the leaf hairs that adhere to insects careless enough to land on one of the ‘leaves’. Look even closer at a mature leaf and you see the remnants of a meal with all the nutrients sucked out. The early Spring means the Sundews are already well developed (they die down during Winter). If the mires stay wet you can expect Sundew to thrive and get relatively large, they should flower well too. Around Furzehill you’ll mostly see the round leaved sundew as in the photo but in other parts of the New Forest there is the long leaved sundew and an intermediate form.