Afternoon illumination

The geographical alignment of our valley seems to give rise to very special evening light under certain circumstances, especially in Spring and Autumn. Usually after a spell of rain when the sky clears locally with passed dark clouds to the East and some cloud remains out to the West we get a show of what we call ‘green light’. As the sun gets close to setting it seems to sneak a strong burst of light horizontally under the distant cloud to bathe us in a flood of ‘golden hour’ light. All the trees and bracken clad hillsides turn a striking, rich orangey colour so intense that photos of the phenomenon look to have been overly photo-shopped and unreal. Those lucky enough to experience this occasional light show find it uplifting and exciting – I think we all tend to respond favourably to ‘warm’ light. I was prompted to write this little item because a couple of days ago this occurred and it coincided with the flowering of the wild Cherry trees at the top of the CL – those on the site were able to enjoy this brief bit of local drama.

I recently found this quote from Gilpin that shows the New Forest seems to specialise in this seasonal delight:

“But the effect of light is best seen in an evening storm, when it rises from the east, behind the woody bank; while the sun sinking in the west, throws a splendour upon the trees, which seen to such advantage against the darkness of the hemisphere, shows the full effect of light and shade.”
(William Gilpin, 1791

If you enjoy photography…

Furzehill Farm CL is a great base for keen photographers whatever their favourite subjects.

Close by are the Blashford lakes famous for waterfowl and other bird life. The coast is just a few miles away and the CL is surrounded by photogenic landscape. The Forest animals (Cows, Ponies and Donkeys) are always happy to pose for the camera. Even moody days can be full of opportunity – in an April morning fog I found these shots: Furzehill in the Fog

Birches on Gorley Common
Birches on Gorley Common